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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"What if the ocean's climate-controlling 'conveyor belt' came to a halt?"

FOX News (USA) - "The specific trend pattern we found in measurements looks exactly like what is predicted by computer simulations as a result of a slowdown in the Gulf Stream system [...] And I see no other plausible explanation for it," comments Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) on a new study that delivers stronger evidence for a weakening of the Atlantic overturning circulation (AMOC). Source: FOX News (USA), 17.04.2018.

"What if the ocean's climate-controlling 'conveyor belt' came to a halt?" - Read More…

"The oceans' circulation hasn't been this sluggish in 1,000 years. That's bad news."

The Washington Post (USA) - Scientific analysis of sea surface temperature data provides new evidence that the major ocean circulation called Atlantic overturning has slowed down by about 15 percent in the last 70 years. Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) tells the major US newspaper The Washington Post, that this was "something that climate models have predicted for a long time, but we weren't sure it was really happening. I think it is happening, [...] And I think it's bad news." Climate change is a prime suspect for the worrying weakening. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 11.04.2018.

"The oceans' circulation hasn't been this sluggish in 1,000 years. That's bad news." - Read More…

"Study: Global Warming Is Weakening Key Ocean Circulation"

The New York Times (USA) - The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), of which the widely known Gulf Stream is a part, is one of our planet's most important heat transport systems. A new scientific study by a team around Levke Caesar and Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), provides stronger evidence for the weakening of the AMOC - which is weaker today than any time before in more than 1000 years. Source: The New York Times (USA), 11.04.2018.

"Study: Global Warming Is Weakening Key Ocean Circulation" - Read More…

"Arctic enveloped in warmth as Europe shivers"

Financial Times (UK) - "In winter, the freezing Arctic air is normally 'locked' by strong circumpolar winds several tens of kilometres high in the atmosphere, known as the stratospheric polar vortex, so that the cold air is confined near the pole," says Marlene Kretschmer from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in the major British business newspaper Financial Times. But Arctic warming has led to a weakening of the circulation over the past decades. Source: Financial Times (UK), 01.03.2018.

"Arctic enveloped in warmth as Europe shivers" - Read More…

"Why is Europe so cold right now?"

BBC World (UK) - In the end of February, cold air blew across the European continent. Last year, a study led by Marlene Kretschmer from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) found, weak states of the so-called polar vortex allowing polar air to escape to the Northern hemisphere have become more persistent over the past decades. In an interview with BBC World, PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf puts the present cold weather into the context of current scientific findings. Source: BBC World (UK), 01.03.2018.

"Why is Europe so cold right now?" - Read More…

"OUR BLUE PLANET: Saving the Earth for the Future"

Japan International Broadcasting - The Blue Planet Prize honors outstanding thinkers who help to meet challenges of planetary dimensions. The world’s most prestigious award for pioneers in environmental science was given to the internationally renowned climate scientist John Schellnhuber last year in Tokyo. The Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) received the prize for establishing a new field of science, Earth System Analysis, and introducing most influential concepts including the notion of tipping elements in the climate system. On this occasion, the major Japanese television broadcaster JIB has now presented a portrait of John Schellnhuber and his work. Source: Japan International Broadcasting, 16.02.2018.

"OUR BLUE PLANET: Saving the Earth for the Future" - Read More…

"Anders Levermann: The Great River Floods"

Radio Ecoshock (Canada) - Already today, fluvial floods are among the most devastating natural disasters. Rainfall changes caused by global warming will further increase river flood risks across the globe. Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have now calculated the required increase in flood protection until the 2040s worldwide. PIK-scientist Anders Levermann contributed to the new study and speaks in an interview with Radio Ecoshock about the estimated future flood risks. Source: Radio Ecoshock (Canada), 01.02.2018.

"Anders Levermann: The Great River Floods" - Read More…

"It’s the big new idea for stopping climate change — but it has huge environmental problems of its own"

The Washington Post (USA) - Removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere becomes particularly important if the world misses its targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But deploying BECCS technology on a scale needed to effect a significant dent in global emissions would use up massive amounts of water, fertilizer and land, a new study by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) claims. Lead author Vera Heck explains: “We could achieve substantial amounts of bioenergy potentials, but this would really come at the cost of extensive environmental damage in many other dimensions.” Source: The Washington Post (USA), 22.01.2018.

"It’s the big new idea for stopping climate change — but it has huge environmental problems of its own" - Read More…

"Why So Cold? Climate Change May Be Part of the Answer"

The New York Times (USA) - When the strong winds that circle the Arctic slacken, cold polar air can escape and cause extreme winter chills in parts of the Northern hemisphere. Already last year, a study by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research showed, that these weak states have become more persistent over the past four decades. “We’re trying to understand these dynamic processes that lead to cold winters", comments PIK-scientist Marlene Kretschmer in The New York Times. Source: The New York Times (USA), 03.01.2018.

"Why So Cold? Climate Change May Be Part of the Answer" - Read More…

"Why There's a Big Chill in a Warmer World"

Associated Press (USA) - "Anchorage, Alaska, was warmer Tuesday than Jacksonville, Florida. The weather in the U.S. is that upside down", starts the article by the major US news agency AP on the extreme winter chill in North America. A recent study by Marlene Kretschmer from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) on "winter cold extremes linked to high-altitude polar vortex weakening" is quoted for explanation. Source: Voice of America (USA), 02.01.2018.

"Why There's a Big Chill in a Warmer World" - Read More…

"EU must not burn the world's forests for 'renewable' energy"

The Guardian (UK) - "The European Union is moving to enact a directive to double Europe's current renewable energy by 2030. This is admirable, but a critical flaw in the present version would accelerate climate change, allowing countries, power plants and factories to claim that cutting down trees and burning them for energy fully qualifies as renewable energy", writes a group of internationally renowned scientists in the major British newspaper The Guardian. Among them is Wolfgang Lucht from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). He is co-chair of the research domain Earth System Analysis and member of the German Advisory Council on the Environment. The scientists conclude: "We encourage European legislators and other policymakers to amend the present directive because the fate of much of the world's forests is literally at stake." Source: The Guardian (UK), 14.12.2017.

"EU must not burn the world's forests for 'renewable' energy" - Read More…

"UN makes global bid to end 'rampant' pollution"

AFP (France) - Environment ministers from about 100 countries gathered in Nairobi to issue a clarion call against air, land and water pollution. "Nine million people die prematurely every year because of environmental intoxication - this is clearly a moral scandal," said PIK-director John Schellnhuber on the rampant pollution to the major French news agency Agence France Presse (AFP). Source: France 24 (France), 01.12.2017.

"UN makes global bid to end 'rampant' pollution" - Read More…

"Clima: a Berlino esperimento su 100 famiglie per ridurre CO2"

ANSA (Italy) - From this December, 100 private households in Berlin will be testing what climate action means in everyday life in the project "Climate-Neutral Living in Berlin". They will be supported by experts from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). The major Italian news agency ANSA reports on the kick-off of the living lab and cites PIK-scientist Fritz Reusswig, who is managing the project. Text in Italian. Source: ANSA (Italy), 30.11.2017.

"Clima: a Berlino esperimento su 100 famiglie per ridurre CO2" - Read More…

"Climat: le père du 2°C place son espoir dans la jeunesse"

AFP (France) - "We have chosen the wrong model for a happy life: comfort, consume... but this way of life doesn't make us happier", said the internationally renowned climate scientist and PIK-Director John Schellnhuber to the major French news agency Agence France Presse, with a view to the ongoing climate change. Text in French. Source: Magazine Goodplanet (France), 16.11.2017.

"Climat: le père du 2°C place son espoir dans la jeunesse" - Read More…

"Merkel to address climate talks amid calls for coal exit"

AP (USA) - "Germany as a climate champion could definitely get out of coal fairly quickly, but we keep on operating the dirtiest of all fossil fuels to export the excess power", said PIK-Director John Schellnhuber to the world's biggest news agency Associated Press, on the occasion of this year's UN climate conference. Source: Arkansas Online (USA), 15.11.2017.

"Merkel to address climate talks amid calls for coal exit" - Read More…

"China increasingly seen as important partner in climate cooperation"

Xinhua (China) - During COP23, PIK's chief economist Ottmar Edenhofer expected in an interview with the major Chinese news agency Xinhua, "that China and Germany step up cooperation in electric mobility, photovoltaic industry, and city planning to enable electronic mobility as well as to address congestion and local pollution", as the agency writes. Source: Xinhua News Network (China), 10.11.2017.

"China increasingly seen as important partner in climate cooperation" - Read More…

"Counting the true costs of climate change"

Phys.org (UK) - Hundreds of millions of people will be affected by climate change impacts and their implications for health or migration already within the next few decades, sectors that so far often get overlooked in this context. This is one of the insights of the Impacts World Conference organised by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in Germany this week. About 500 scientists from 67 countries were gathering at the conference with the title “Counting the true costs of climate change” to push climate impact research to the next level. Source: Phys.org (UK), 11.10.2017.

"Counting the true costs of climate change" - Read More…

"Coal formation almost plunged Earth into a snowball state"

The Daily Mail (UK) - A new study shows: While burning coal today causes Earth to overheat, about 300 million years ago the formation of that same coal brought our planet close to global glaciation. "The amount of CO2 stored in Earth's coal reserves was once big enough to push our climate out of balance. When released by burning the coal, the CO2 is again destabilizing the Earth system", says study author Georg Feulner from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: The Daily Mail (UK), 10.10.2017.

"Coal formation almost plunged Earth into a snowball state" - Read More…

"A brief history of CO2 emissions"

Short film - Fossil energy sources are millions of years of stored solar energy. Its exploitation provided us short-term economic growth. Yet through the burning of fossil fuels, in just 250 years humans have increased CO2 quantity in the atmosphere by 40 percent - to levels last seen four million years ago. Hence the Earth already heated up by 1° Celsius - and will continue to do so by up to 4° with unconstrained emissions. An animated short film, developed under scientific lead by Elmar Kriegler and based upon data research by Lavinia Baumstark, both from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), shows: The time to act is now! Released at 13.09.2017.

"A brief history of CO2 emissions" - Read More…

"Irma leaves trail of destruction in Caribbean"

CBC Radio (Canada) - Have we ever seen a Hurricane like Irma? In an interview with Canada's major public broadcasting radio CBC, Anders Levermann explains the connections between the ongoing human-caused climate change and the hazardous storms striking the Carribean (from minute 11.10). Levermann is Co-Chair of the Research Domain Sustainable Solutions at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: CBC Radio (Canada), 08.09.2017.

"Irma leaves trail of destruction in Caribbean" - Read More…

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