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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"Antarctica un-plugged: climate change, ice dynamics and sea level rise"

PIK-scientist Ricarda Winkelmann is not only Junior Professor of Climate System Analysis at Potsdam University, she has also contributed to the Sea-Level Change chapter of the 5th IPCC report. In her multimedia lecture at 2017's re:publica conference in Berlin, she reported from her scientific expedition to Antarctica and brought the audience up-to-date in research on climate change, ice dynamics and sea level rise. Join her on a journey far south. Audio and video recording, 08.05.2017.

"Antarctica un-plugged: climate change, ice dynamics and sea level rise" - Read More…

"Warming slowdown dismissed by top scientist"

Past claims of a 'slowdown' of the global warming trend are proven wrong by statistical analysis, a new PIK-study shows. While there is some natural short-term variability, the study finds no significant slowdown or 'pause' in the upward trend. "Because fluctuation is ever-present, it is important to tell the difference between genuine trend change and appearances that are merely the manifestation of 'noise", says PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf. Source: Climate News Network (USA), 26.04.2017.

"Warming slowdown dismissed by top scientist" - Read More…

"March for Science' - in more than 500 cities worldwide"

All around the world, demonstrations for science take place on April 22nd - under the title "March for Science". PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf explains in an interview, why the research community goes out to the streets - and which problems science is facing at the moment. Video in Russian language. Source: Deutsche Welle Russia, 21.04.2017.

"March for Science' - in more than 500 cities worldwide" - Read More…

"Making the Planetary Boundaries Concept Work"

More than 400 researchers and representatives from politics, businesses and society are discussing the concept of Planetary Boundaries this week in Berlin. "The concept of Planetary Boundaries describes on a scientific basis what the limits are that we should adhere to with changes of the planet so that we do not enter dangerous terrain", explains PIK-scientist Wolfgang Lucht. Source: adelphi Channel (YouTube), 12.04.2017.

"Making the Planetary Boundaries Concept Work" - Read More…

"Climate change is altering global air currents – increasing droughts, heatwaves and floods"

Already in 2013, a PIK-study explored the connections between the so-called Rossby-Waves and local surface weather. A new PIK-study delivers further evidence for the human fingerprint on these links. PIK-scientist Kai Kornhuber explains in an illustrated video, how extreme weather events are influenced by the giant airstreams - and how climate change affects them. Source: The Independent (UK), 27.03.2017.

"Climate change is altering global air currents – increasing droughts, heatwaves and floods" - Read More…

"Climate change: 'human fingerprint' found on global extreme weather"

Past PIK-studies have shown that a weaker jet stream makes the weather more persistent and promotes prolonged heat waves. New research provides further evidence, that the conditions for such weather extremes are favourably influenced by human-made climate change. PIK-scientists Stefan Rahmstorf and Kai Kornhuber comment on their results. Source: The Guardian (UK), 27.03.2017.

"Climate change: 'human fingerprint' found on global extreme weather" - Read More…

"Moore's law' for carbon would defeat global warming"

On the eve of this year's Earth hour, international experts propose a roadmap strategy for achieving net-zero emissions by mid-century. "Short-termism has been a problem for all the 25 years I have been involved in climate negotiations," says PIK-director John Schellnhuber. The "carbon law" links short-term targets to long-term goals - by halving emissions every ten years. Source: The Guardian (UK), 23.03.2017.

"Moore's law' for carbon would defeat global warming" - Read More…

"How Do Climate Change Related Natural Disasters Potentially Increase the Risk of Armed Conflicts?"

A PIK-study found out: climate disasters like heat-waves or droughts potentially enhance the risk of armed conflict. While such disasters might be increased through climate change, they can trigger the outbreak of conflicts particularly in ethnically fractionalized societies. In a video feature, PIK-scientist Jonathan Donges explains the study results. Source: Latest Thinking (Germany), 21.03.2017.

"How Do Climate Change Related Natural Disasters Potentially Increase the Risk of Armed Conflicts?" - Read More…

"The Desperate Optimist"

If we want to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement, urgent efforts have to be made: the combustion engine has to be phased out, coal plants must be shut down and concrete and steel for construction need to be replaced. PIK-director John Schellnhuber explains in an interview, why scientists have to leave their ivory towers to be part of the solution. Source: Deutsche Welle (Germany), 15.03.2017.

"The Desperate Optimist" - Read More…

"Amazonas, en riesgo por sequías y deforestación"

Using a novel complex network analysis of water fluxes, a new PIK-study found: future rainfall reductions intensified through climate change could push the Amazon region into a vicious dieback circle. However, a great variety of tree species in a forest patch can strengthen the chance of survival. PIK-scientist Delphine Clara Zemp comments on the study results. Text in Spanish. Source: El Tiempo (Colombia), 13.03.2017.

"Amazonas, en riesgo por sequías y deforestación" - Read More…

"Questions of Stability: An Interview with Stefan Rahmstorf"

Stefan Rahmstorf is co-chair of the PIK Research Domain Earth System Analysis and Professor of Physics of the Oceans at the University of Potsdam. In an interview, he speaks about his scientific career, introduces his current research topics, and emphasizes the dangers of global warming. Source: Earth101 YouTube Channel (Iceland), 03.03.2017.

"Questions of Stability: An Interview with Stefan Rahmstorf" - Read More…

"Severe heatwaves show the need to adapt livestock management for climate"

Climate change has a major impact on food production and security - as the effects of recent heatwaves in Australia have shown once more. PIK-scientist Christin Meyer with Elisabeth Vogel and Richard Eckard from the University of Melbourne explain, how important mitigation and adaptation measures are. Source: The Conversation (Australia), 27.02.2017.

"Severe heatwaves show the need to adapt livestock management for climate" - Read More…

"To The Last Drop"

In a last year's study, PIK-scientists investigated the global potential to produce more food with the same amount of water - by optimizing rain use and irrigation. PIK-scientist Jonas Jaegermeyr explains in a commentary, why water scarcity is a societal phenomenon, and how it could be countered. Source: The Mark News (Canada), 27.02.2017.

"To The Last Drop" - Read More…

"We should assume our worst fears will be realised"

The ambitions of the new US-administration in terms of climate protection still remain unclear. Worrying Donald Trump risks creating "an atmosphere of conflict", PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf emphasizes the need of international co-operation to avoid dangerous global warming. Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), 05.02.2017.

"We should assume our worst fears will be realised" - Read More…

"People around the world are helping the US save its climate data"

As public communication concerning climate change has already been restrained by the Trump administration, the scientific community is worried, that climate data itself could also become restricted from public access. PIK-scientist Anders Levermann explains the global importance of these data from institutions like NASA or NOAA. Source: Public Radio International (USA), 26.01.2017.

"People around the world are helping the US save its climate data" - Read More…

"Global warming could cut essential crop harvests in half"

A new PIK-study found, that in the US, yield losses of 20 percent for wheat, 40 percent for soybean and almost 50 percent for maize are possible by 2100 - without efficient emission reductions. The effects went far beyond the US, one of the largest crop exporters. PIK-scientist Bernhard Schauberger comments on the results. Source: The Independent (UK), 19.01.2017.

"Global warming could cut essential crop harvests in half" - Read More…

"Climate change will hurt crops more than it helps them"

As plants can react to a changing climate in complicated and even contradictory ways, research on the effects of Climate Change on Agriculture is tricky. A new PIK study found, that some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. PIK-scientist Bernhard Schauberger explains the study results. Source: Washington Post (USA), 19.01.2017.

"Climate change will hurt crops more than it helps them" - Read More…

"Climate Change: The Trump Card"

Whilst delegates from 196 states gathered at the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, Donald Trump was elected the President of the United States. How will this interfere with the Paris agreement? PIK-director John Schellnhuber explains the urgency of effective climate policies and interprets Albert Einstein's view on climate protection. Source: BBC Radio 4 (UK) 08.01.2017.

"Climate Change: The Trump Card" - Read More…

"Global ocean circulation may be more vulnerable to shutdown than we thought"

2015 already, a PIK-study revealed hints about a weakening of the "Gulf Stream" called circulation system in the Atlantic Ocean, which had effects on marine eco-systems, the global sea-level and the weather in North America and Europe. In a new simulation by US-scientists, the current seems to be even more vulnerable. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf comments. Source: Washington Post (USA), 04.01.2017.

"Global ocean circulation may be more vulnerable to shutdown than we thought" - Read More…

"La planète enregistre un recul inédit de ses banquises"

Depuis novembre, la couverture mondiale de glace de mer accuse une perte de plus de trois millions de kilomètres carrés par rapport à la moyenne 1981-2010, selon les données du National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) américain. PIK-scientifique Anders Levermann commente: "C’est une situation époustouflante." Source: Le Monde (France), 29.12.2016.

"La planète enregistre un recul inédit de ses banquises" - Read More…

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