Girls' Day gives schoolgirls from all over Germany an insight into climate impact research

 
04/22/2021 – On Girls' Day - 'Future Prospects for Girls' this year, schoolgirls were once again given an insight into the work at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) to discover career prospects in science. Due to the pandemic, this year's Girls' Day took place digitally, allowing for the first time girls from all over Germany to get to know PIK instead of usually just girls from Potsdam and Berlin. Climate researchers Ronja Reese and Constanze Werner talked about their work and answered everything the girls wanted to know in an open question session.
Girls' Day gives schoolgirls from all over Germany an insight into climate impact research
Ronja Reese tells the girls about her research trip to Antarctica.

In a short introductory presentation, the 17 schoolgirls discovered the institute, its history and the interdisciplinary approach to climate impact research. Basic questions such as "What is the difference between weather and climate?" or "How does the greenhouse effect work?" were also answered. Ronja Reese then took the group on a digital journey to Antarctica and told them about her expedition there on the German research ship Polarstern. She explained why the ice is so important for our climate and showed them the tipping points of different elements of the Earth system. 

Back from Antarctica, the girls faced the super computer and received insights into Constanze Werner's research work on the dynamic vegetation model LPJmL, with a practical and playful introduction to programming. With the knowledge they had gained, the girls then slipped into the role of a state representative at a simulated climate conference. The aim of this role play was to agree on a binding compromise for a common climate policy with all participating state representatives. PIK also conducts research on climate policy across disciplinary boundaries.

As Germany's largest career orientation day for girls and young women, Girls' Day opens doors and perspectives in order to introduce young talents to jobs with a previously low proportion of women and to counteract gender stereotypes. This year, PIK focused particularly on the fields of physics, mathematics and computer science. The action day is funded by the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth (BMFSFJ) and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Girls' Day took place at PIK for the 10th time this year.