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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"La planète enregistre un recul inédit de ses banquises"

Depuis novembre, la couverture mondiale de glace de mer accuse une perte de plus de trois millions de kilomètres carrés par rapport à la moyenne 1981-2010, selon les données du National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) américain. PIK-scientifique Anders Levermann commente: "C’est une situation époustouflante." Source: Le Monde (France), 29.12.2016.

"La planète enregistre un recul inédit de ses banquises" - Read More…

"Financing the Climate-Change Transition"

As humanity faces unprecedented climate risks, "for both public and private actors, the time to act is now", conclude PIK-director John Schellnhuber, Christian Thimann from AXA and Axel Weber from UBS. In a joint commentary, they explain, how the Climate-Change Transition could be financed. Source: Project Syndicate (seated in Czech Republic), 24.11.2016.

"Financing the Climate-Change Transition" - Read More…

"Threat to NASA climate role a 'disaster' for global warming action"

NASA's Earth Science Division makes significant contributions to global efforts to monitor and counter global warming. Ending NASA's Earth Observatory Mission through the Trump administration "would seriously impair our ability to see the big planetary picture", criticizes PIK-director John Schellnhuber among other climate researchers. Source: Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), 24.11.2016.

"Threat to NASA climate role a 'disaster' for global warming action" - Read More…

"Paris climate agreement enters into force"

At the COP20 Conference in Paris in 2015, emissions reductions in order to keep global warming "well below 2°C" were negotiated. Whilst the agreement now enters into force, leading climate experts, among them PIK-scientists Stefan Rahmstorf and Bill Hare, comment on current climate policies and tell their expectations for the future. Source: The Conversation (UK), 03.11.2016.

"Paris climate agreement enters into force" - Read More…

"Record heat streak ends but global warming unrelenting"

The 16-month streak of record high average temperatures finally came to an end with September, which was slightly cooler than last year. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf and other climate experts explain, that global warming, nevertheless, is going on. Source: Vancouver Sun (Canada), 19.10.2016.

"Record heat streak ends but global warming unrelenting" - Read More…

"How will we power the planet in 2050?"

To limit global warming below 2°C, a long-term reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is necessary. PIK-scientist Gunnar Luderer explains, why therefore "the energy mix in 2050 will have to look fundamentally different from the one we have today." Source: CNBC (USA), 10.10.2016.

"How will we power the planet in 2050?" - Read More…

"Climate change is an emergency today"

In this year of unprecedented temperature levels, also other records concerning heatwaves, floodings, wildfires and hurricanes tumble around the world. Alongside other climate experts, PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf comments on these extremes: "I hope people realise that global warming is not something down the road, but it is here now and is affecting us now." Source: The Guardian (UK), 17.06.2016

"Climate change is an emergency today" - Read More…

"Do Sweden and Germany hold the key to unlocking climate action worldwide?"

"The only way of stabilising global warming at well below 2˚C is to urgently decrease global emissions and create a fossil fuel-free world economy no later than 2040-2060", say PIK-director John Schellnhuber and Johan Rockström, director of the Stockholm Resilience Center, in their recent op-ed article. How Germany and Sweden's decision about the Vattenfall Europe browncoal sell-off could influence global climate policies. Source: Huffington Post, 08.06.2016.

"Do Sweden and Germany hold the key to unlocking climate action worldwide?" - Read More…

Mercator Climate Lecture 2016: "The World in 2050 - Towards Sustainable Development and Deep Decarbonization"

More than 1000 people attended the 2016 Mercator Climate Lecture "The World in 2050 - Towards Sustainable Development and Deep Decarbonization" in Berlin on Wednesday. Top US-economist Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University and Special Advisor on Sustainable Development for the United Nations, gave a much-applauded keynote. This was followed by an intense discussion with Ottmar Edenhofer, Chief Economist at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and Professor at Technische Universität (TU) Berlin. The lecture is a joint project by Stiftung Mercator, Technische Universität Berlin, and PIK. Source: TU Berlin, 01.06.2016.

Mercator Climate Lecture 2016: "The World in 2050 - Towards Sustainable Development and Deep Decarbonization" - Read More…

"Migration in the age of Climate Change"

Migration is mostly driven by a multitude of factors - and almost never by a single cause. At the same time, global environmental change, and specifically climate change, is an additional and potentially severe risk factor. PIK-scientist Hermann Lotze-Campen and Mariam Traore Chazalnoel from the International Institute for Migration speak in a video statement about the topic.

"Migration in the age of Climate Change" - Read More…

"Why Half a Degree Matters"

A new PIK-study compared the impacts of 1.5°C and 2.0°C of further global warming by means of several different indicators. The PIK-scientists Jacob Schewe and Carl Schleussner explain, why half a degree matters and why different regions show different vulnerabilities for climate change impacts. Source: National Geographic (USA), 21.04.2016.

"Why Half a Degree Matters" - Read More…

"A half a degree warming could make the difference"

1.5°C or 2.0°C - two goals for preventing further global warming were mentioned in the Paris Agreement, that is now to be signed. A new PIK-study analyzed different indicators of climate impacts and showed that the two goals would make significant differences. PIK-scientists Jacob Schewe and Carl Schleussner explain the results. Source: Science Magazine (USA), 21.04.2016.

"A half a degree warming could make the difference" - Read More…

"India's monsoon can now be forecasted significantly earlier"

A new PIK-study introduces a novel monsoon prediction method based on a network analysis of regional weather data. The heavy summer rains are of vital importance for millions of farmers. The PIK-scientists Veronika Stolbova, Elena Surovyatkina and Jürgen Kurths explain the relevance of the new method. Source: The Financial Express (India), 21.04.2016.

"India's monsoon can now be forecasted significantly earlier" - Read More…

"How giant airstreams get trapped sometimes"

Already in 2013, a PIK-study explored the interconnections between the so-called Rossby-Waves and local surface weather. A new PIK-study now revealed, that the balkan floods in 2014 were triggered by these mechanisms. PIK-scientist Kai Kornhuber explains in an illustrated video, how extreme weather events are influenced by the giant airstreams - and how climate change affects them. 18.04.2016.

"How giant airstreams get trapped sometimes" - Read More…

"How far sea levels could rise thanks to climate change"

Shortly ago, several PIK-studies showed: the sea level is now rising faster than in the last 28 centuries, that with unconstrained emissions, it will continue to rise about 50 to 130 cm in the next century, and even massive geoengineering approaches would not be able to prevent this. PIK-scientist Anders Levermann comments on the results in a synopsis about the danger of sea level rise due to climate change. Source: BBC (UK), 11.04.2016.

"How far sea levels could rise thanks to climate change" - Read More…

"Reducing food waste could help mitigate climate change"

A new PIK-study shows: By 2050, about a tenth of global greenhouse-gas emissions from agriculture could be traced back to food waste. PIK-scientist Prajal Pradhan explains how reducing it would offer the chance to ensure food security as well as it could help mitigate dangerous climate change. Source: Washington Post (USA), 07.04.2016.

"Reducing food waste could help mitigate climate change" - Read More…

"Spike in global temperature fuels climate change fears"

Recent February's spike in global temperatures was the biggest departure from the norm in 137 years of records. "We are running out of time to avoid a 2-degree world", PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf comments. Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), 25.03.2016

"Spike in global temperature fuels climate change fears" - Read More…

"Welcome to the Climate Emergency"

Global temperature records have recently been broken again and again, last February was 1.35°C warmer than average. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf states that this is not a surprise and that "time has almost run out to get emissions down". Source: The Guardian, 17.03.2016

"Welcome to the Climate Emergency" - Read More…

"February’s global temperature spike is a wake-up call"

Global February Temperatures showed a disturbing upward spike. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf and Steve Sherwood from the University of New South Wales explain how global warming and El Niño combine to produce the record warmth. Source: The Conversation (UK), 16.03.2016.

"February’s global temperature spike is a wake-up call" - Read More…

"February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount"

In this February, the Earth's overall surface temperature was about 1.35°C warmer than the average temperature for the month. Do we face a climate emergency? PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf and other experts comment on the record-breaking temperature. Source: The Guardian (UK), 14.03.2016.

"February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount" - Read More…

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