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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"Climat: le père du 2°C place son espoir dans la jeunesse"

AFP (France) - "We have chosen the wrong model for a happy life: comfort, consume... but this way of life doesn't make us happier", said the internationally renowned climate scientist and PIK-Director John Schellnhuber to the major French news agency Agence France Presse, with a view to the ongoing climate change. Text in French. Source: Magazine Goodplanet (France), 16.11.2017.

"Climat: le père du 2°C place son espoir dans la jeunesse" - Read More…

"Merkel to address climate talks amid calls for coal exit"

AP (USA) - "Germany as a climate champion could definitely get out of coal fairly quickly, but we keep on operating the dirtiest of all fossil fuels to export the excess power", said PIK-Director John Schellnhuber to the world's biggest news agency Associated Press, on the occasion of this year's UN climate conference. Source: Arkansas Online (USA), 15.11.2017.

"Merkel to address climate talks amid calls for coal exit" - Read More…

"China increasingly seen as important partner in climate cooperation"

Xinhua (China) - During COP23, PIK's chief economist Ottmar Edenhofer expected in an interview with the major Chinese news agency Xinhua, "that China and Germany step up cooperation in electric mobility, photovoltaic industry, and city planning to enable electronic mobility as well as to address congestion and local pollution", as the agency writes. Source: Xinhua News Network (China), 10.11.2017.

"China increasingly seen as important partner in climate cooperation" - Read More…

"Counting the true costs of climate change"

Phys.org (UK) - Hundreds of millions of people will be affected by climate change impacts and their implications for health or migration already within the next few decades, sectors that so far often get overlooked in this context. This is one of the insights of the Impacts World Conference organised by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in Germany this week. About 500 scientists from 67 countries were gathering at the conference with the title “Counting the true costs of climate change” to push climate impact research to the next level. Source: Phys.org (UK), 11.10.2017.

"Counting the true costs of climate change" - Read More…

"Coal formation almost plunged Earth into a snowball state"

The Daily Mail (UK) - A new study shows: While burning coal today causes Earth to overheat, about 300 million years ago the formation of that same coal brought our planet close to global glaciation. "The amount of CO2 stored in Earth's coal reserves was once big enough to push our climate out of balance. When released by burning the coal, the CO2 is again destabilizing the Earth system", says study author Georg Feulner from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: The Daily Mail (UK), 10.10.2017.

"Coal formation almost plunged Earth into a snowball state" - Read More…

"A brief history of CO2 emissions"

Short film - Fossil energy sources are millions of years of stored solar energy. Its exploitation provided us short-term economic growth. Yet through the burning of fossil fuels, in just 250 years humans have increased CO2 quantity in the atmosphere by 40 percent - to levels last seen four million years ago. Hence the Earth already heated up by 1° Celsius - and will continue to do so by up to 4° with unconstrained emissions. An animated short film, developed under scientific lead by Elmar Kriegler and based upon data research by Lavinia Baumstark, both from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), shows: The time to act is now! Released at 13.09.2017.

"A brief history of CO2 emissions" - Read More…

"Irma leaves trail of destruction in Caribbean"

CBC Radio (Canada) - Have we ever seen a Hurricane like Irma? In an interview with Canada's major public broadcasting radio CBC, Anders Levermann explains the connections between the ongoing human-caused climate change and the hazardous storms striking the Carribean (from minute 11.10). Levermann is Co-Chair of the Research Domain Sustainable Solutions at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: CBC Radio (Canada), 08.09.2017.

"Irma leaves trail of destruction in Caribbean" - Read More…

"The likelihood of floods is changing with the climate"

The Economist (UK) - Already in 2015, a study by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) detected a clear upward trend in the past few decades towards more record-breaking heavy rainfall events. The increase was found to be consistent with rising global temperatures. The major British newspaper The Economist now highlights this and other studies providing evidence for an increased likelihood of severe flood events. Source: The Economist (UK), 31.08.2017.

"The likelihood of floods is changing with the climate" - Read More…

"Debate over climate and hurricanes is getting louder and louder"

The Washington Post (USA) - A warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor. This was favouring extreme rainfall events "because they tend to occur with moisture-saturated air masses", explains Stefan Rahmstorf in an article on hurricanes by the major US newspaper The Washington Post. Stefan Rahmstorf is Co-Chair of the Research Domain Earth System Analysis at the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: The Washington Post (USA), 30.08.2017.

"Debate over climate and hurricanes is getting louder and louder" - Read More…

"Why Harvey is stuck near Texas"

Bloomberg (USA) - Hurricane Harvey had a devastating impact on Texas. For several days, the giant storm persisted nearly stationary. Earlier this year, a study by scientists around Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) delivered further evidence, that climate change might weaken giant airstreams circling the Earth, thus favouring stationary weather conditions. The major US news agency Bloomberg reports. Source: Bloomberg (USA), 30.08.2017.

"Why Harvey is stuck near Texas" - Read More…

"Is tropical storm Harvey linked to climate change?"

The Guardian (UK) - Will stationary storms like Harvey become more common in the future? Giant airstreams circle Earth's Northern hemisphere in huge turns between the tropics and the Arctic. When these planetary waves slow down, extreme weather conditions can stay longer in a given location, explains Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in an article by the major British newspaper The Guardian. Source: The Guardian (UK), 29.08.2017.

"Is tropical storm Harvey linked to climate change?" - Read More…

"Power demand to peak in Europe summers, not winters"

France 24 (France) - A new study from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) projected the effect of climate change on European electricity consumption. Energy demands will rise due to increased indoor air conditioning in hotter summers, especially in Southern Europe. Leonie Wenz was lead author of the study and explains the results in an article by the major French news agency AFP, as released by the TV channel France 24. Source: France 24 (France), 28.08.2017.

"Power demand to peak in Europe summers, not winters" - Read More…

"Electricity demand in Southern Europe to soar"

The Guardian (UK) - A new study shows: future warming due to greenhouse gas emissions will change electricity consumption patterns in Europe. Daily peak loads in Southern Europe will increase and overall consumption will shift from the North to the South. Anders Levermann from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) was part of the research team, and comments on the results in an article by the major British newspaper The Guardian. Source: The Guardian (UK), 28.08.2017.

"Electricity demand in Southern Europe to soar" - Read More…

"Le Sahel, bientôt du manque d'eau au trop-plein?"

Franceinfo (France) - Mauretania, Mali, Niger, Tchad, Soudan - the Sahel belt south of the Sahara is considered one of the driest regions of Africa. Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) now found evidence for a possible abrupt change to heavy seasonal rainfall beyond a global warming of 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius. Such climatic changes would pose a major adaptation challenge and thus an additional burden for the already troubled region. Text in French. Source: Franceinfo (France), 02.08.2017.

"Le Sahel, bientôt du manque d'eau au trop-plein?" - Read More…

"Climate change pushing Asia towards doom"

The Financial Express (India) - Continuing global warming would lead to severe and manifold dangers for countries in Asia and the Pacific, according to a recent major report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). At the same time, "the Asian countries hold Earth's future in their hands. If they choose to protect themselves against dangerous climate change, they will help to save the entire planet", says PIK-director John Schellnhuber. Source: The Financial Express (India), 31.07.2017.

"Climate change pushing Asia towards doom" - Read More…

"Asia warned of climate catastrophe"

Financial Times Chinese (UK) - A recent major report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) warns of devastating consequences of unabated climate change to countries in Asia and the Pacific. Their future growth could be affected, current development gains reversed, and well-being could be threatened. Even adapting to 1.5°C global warming would be a major task for the region, PIK-director John Schellnhuber says. Source: Financial Times Chinese (UK), 14.07.2017.

"Asia warned of climate catastrophe" - Read More…

"Global Warming Could Turn Sahel Green within Decades"

The North Africa Post (Morocco) - By means of computer simulations, PIK-scientists found evidence that rainfall in the Sahel might abruptly increase beyond 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius of global warming. Through crossing critical humidity thresholds, a Monsoon circulation could be switched on. "This is a self-amplifying feedback. More moisture, more rain, more latent heat released, and this heat is amplifying the circulation as a whole", explains Jacob Schewe from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Source: The North Africa Post (Morocco), 08.07.2017.

"Global Warming Could Turn Sahel Green within Decades" - Read More…

"Climate change may turn Africa's arid Sahel green"

Voice of America (USA) - Global warming could turn one of Africa's driest regions into a very wet one, a new PIK-study shows. Although this change is potentially beneficial in the long term, the societal outcome also depends on whether the region is prepared for fluctuations, says lead author Jacob Schewe from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). "The enormous change that we might see would clearly pose a huge adaptation challenge to the Sahel", adds PIK-scientist Anders Levermann, who also contributed to the study. Source: Voice of America (USA), 05.07.2017.

"Climate change may turn Africa's arid Sahel green" - Read More…

"0,5°C grados de más bastan para multiplicar los desastres climáticos"

Radio France International Español (France) - In the Paris Climate Agreement, a climate target of 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius was negotiated. So it is high on the agenda to find out how far this half a degree matters. The scientists Carl-Friedrich Schleussner and Peter Pfleiderer from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Reserach (PIK) dealed with this topic in a commentary in the renowned scientific journal Nature Climate Change. Text in Spanish. Source: Radio France International Español (France), 30.06.2017.

"0,5°C grados de más bastan para multiplicar los desastres climáticos" - Read More…

"Turning the Climate Tide by 2020"

The Washington Post (USA) - The world needs high-speed climate action for an immediate reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions, leading climate scientists alongside former UN climate secretary Christiana Figueres state in a highlight scientific comment. Among them are PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf, PIK-director John Schellnhuber and Johan Rockström from the Stockholm Resilience Center. The latter two proposed a "Carbon Law" linking short-term targets to long-term goals for deep decarbonization earlier this year. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 29.06.2017.

"Turning the Climate Tide by 2020" - Read More…

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