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EYES

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The EYES project focuses on the theory, practice, and tools of science-based stakeholder dialogues.


“Sustainability is about being nimble, not being right.”
(Rayner and Malone, 1998)


In postnormal science, science-based stakeholder dialogues play a crucial role. One basic idea is that the role of science is not to find the truth and convey it to society but to engage with society for looking for reasonable insights and actions. EYES will contribute to advance both theory and practice of science-based stakeholder dialogues.

 

The EYES team (current and former members):

Antonella Battaglini
Hannah Förster
Armin Haas (project speaker)
Jette Krause
Gerhard Petschel-Held
Julia Schwarzkopf
Anne de la Vega
Martin Welp

 

The work of EYES is organised in nine threads:

TNT: The Theory & Tools Shop
Bayesian Risk Solutions
The Beijing Process
The KyotoPlus Process
The Games Shop
The Trouble-in-Paradise Process
The Post 2012 Process
The Superthread
Global Investments for 2° C

 

The Theory & Tools Shop
Chief executive spinner: Martin Welp

The EYES project has outlined a new theoretical framework for science-based stakeholder dialogues. The framework is built on three different theoretical traditions: Organisational Learning, Social Psychology, and formal approaches (Rational Actor Paradigm, Bayesian Learning). The Theory of Reflexive Dialogues has practical implications for the development of tools and for conducting stakeholder dialogues in management, policy, and science. The concept of learning is the cornerstone of the integrative theory.
On the level of tools, we make intensive use of stakeholder dialogues and games and contribute to their advancement.
Our platform for dialogues with expert stakeholders (companies, NGOs and policy-makers) is the European Climate Forum (ECF). PIK is one of the founding scientific members of ECF. Regular interaction with members, high level events and exchange of arguments are key elements of our dialogue practice.

 

Bayesian Risk Solutions
Chief executive spinner: Armin Haas

Climate change devalues the past. It modifies the general climatic and political framework in such a way that frequentist statistical methods and a simple extrapolation of previous trends are no longer suitable for drawing reliable conclusions regarding future developments. Thus, an increasing number of decisions must be taken on an uncertain basis. Bayesian risk management techniques provide promising tools for tackling this challenge. They facilitate improved assessments of climate change impacts, as well as of climate policy to come and its implications. Bayesian risk management techniques therefore constitute the core element of this thread.
In the project “Mainstreaming of Climate Risks and Opportunities in the Financial Sector” we want to make Bayesian risk management techniques applicable for German financial service providers. In order to meet their needs, we engage into stakeholder dialogues with our business partners, i.e., Allianz Global Investors, HypoVereinsbank, Munich Re, the Society of Investment Professionals in Germany (DVFA), and WestLB. The project aims at implementing Bayesian risk management approaches in their mainstream operations. The project is conducted in co-operation with the NGO Germanwatch, the University of Potsdam, the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW), the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, and the European Climate Forum (ECF).
(see: http://www.climate-mainstreaming.net).

 

The Beijing Process
Chief executive spinner: Antonella Battaglini

In the Beijing process, we gather stakeholders and inquire how they define “dangerous climate change”.
Key event:

  • The International Symposium: "Key vulnerable regions and climate change: Identifying thresholds for impacts and adaptation in relation to Article 2 of the UNFCCC" (Beijing, 27-30 October 2004) (see report at: http://www.european-climate-forum.net/beijing/).
In the Symposium, it turned out that the 2° C target of the EU is a reasonable goal for avoiding dangerous climate change.

 

The KyotoPlus Process
Chief executive spinner: Antonella Battaglini

KyotoPlus is a joint initiative between ECF and the Heinrich Boell Foundation, which fosters dialogues in particular in the area of long-term climate policy (see: http://www.kyotoplus.org).
Key event:
  • KyotoPlus – Wege aus der Klimafalle, Internationaler Kongress, Berlin, 28. - 29. September 2006, unter der Schirmherrschaft von Prof. Dr. Klaus Töpfer (see: Konferenzprogramm).

 

The Games Shop
Chief executive spinner: Armin Haas

Climate games can serve as communication tools in individual and in team learning processes, and as a kick-off in stakeholder dialogues. We therefore develop, test, and use climate games (see the family of ECF climate games: http://www.european-climate-forum.net/games/). In co-operation with Munich Re, we have developed the climate board game “Winds of Change”. The main authors of this innovative tool are Armin Haas, Klaus Hasselmann, and Carlo C. Jaeger (see: http://www.european-climate-forum.net/woc/).

 

The Trouble-in-Paradise Process
Chief executive spinner: Armin Haas

Together with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (see: www.caribbeanclimate.bz), we organise a stakeholder driven research process on mitigation and adaptation measures in the Caribbean.
Key events:

  • Trouble-in-Paradise Pathfinder Workshop, held at PIK on 9.-10. May 2006. The workshop was jointly organised by PIK, ECF, Quest, and the CCCCC.
  • First PIK/CCCCC Micro-Workshop on Vulnerability and Adaptation on Climate Change, held at PIK on 27 November 2006.


Right now, five writing teams are preparing a white paper each on specific aspects of climate risk management in the Caribbean. The plan is that each writing group will eventually come up with a research proposal on the basis of its white paper in the course of 2007. Each proposal will be self-contained but complementary to the other proposals. With the Trouble-in-Paradise process we thus aim at creating a fleet of projects that can manoeuvre more flexible than an integrated project and addresses several important issues of climate risk management in the Caribbean.

 

The Post 2012 Process
Chief executive spinner: Antonella Battaglini

In the post 2012 process we ask for policy schemes that are ecologically and economically sustainable and politically feasible.
Key event:

 

The Superthread
Chief executive spinner: Antonella Battaglini

The Superthread is about the Supergrid. The Supergrid is the concept of a net of high voltage direct current transmission lines that spread over North Africa and Europe. With this line it is possible to deliver electricity produced in Northern Africa to Europe. It is technically and economically viable to cover all of the European electricity demand from renewables sources (wind and sun) in North Africa. It is, however, a big challenge to bring about the necessary political framework that would enable financial markets to redirect financial streams to this energy option.

 

Global Investments for 2° C
Chief executive spinner: Antonella Battaglini

To meet the EU target of 2° C, we must decide on where the vast investments in the global energy sector should go. These decisions must be taken despite the uncertainties of climate change science and of the policy response to it.
We set up a stakeholder driven process for assessing needs, opportunities, and threads for a low carbon technology investments.
Key event: Global Investment for 2° C. ECF annual conference 2007. Berlin, March 26-28.

 

Publications

  • Haas, A. and Jaeger, C. 2005. Agents, Bayes, and Climatic Risks – a modular modelling approach. Advances in Geosciences 4: 3–7.
  • Kasemir, B., Jäger, J., Jaeger, C.C., Gardner, M. (eds). 2003. Public Participation in Sustainability Science. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Welp, M., Battaglini, A. and Jaeger, C.C. 2007. The Role of Stakeholder Dialogues in Defining Dangerous Climate Change: The Beijng Excercise. In: Anthony Patt, Dagmar Schröter, Anne de la Vega-Leindert & Richard Klein (Eds) 2007. Environmental VulnerabilityAssessment for Policy and Decision-Making. Earthscan (in preparation).
  • Welp, M., Battaglini, A. & Jaeger, C. 2007. Social relevance of vulnerability assessments: role of stakeholder dialogues in defining dangerous levels of climate. In: Anthony Patt, Richard Klein, & Anne de la Vega-Leinert (Eds.) 2007. Environmental Vulnerability Assessment for Policy and Decision-Making. Earthscan (in preparation).
  • Welp, M., de la Vega-Leinert, A., Stoll-Kleemann, S. and Jaeger, C. C. 2006. Science-based stakeholder dialogues: tools and theories. Global Environmental Change Vol 16 (2): 170-181.
  • Welp, M., de la Vega-Leinert, A, Stoll-Kleemann, S. and Fürstenau, C. 2006. Science-based stakeholder dialogues in climate change research. In: Stoll-Kleemann, S. & Welp, M. (Eds.) 2006. Stakeholder dialogues in natural resources management: Theory and practice. Springer, Berlin.Welp, M. & Stoll-Kleemann, S. 2006. Theoretical Framework. In: Stoll-Kleemann, S. & Welp, M. (Eds.) 2006. Stakeholder dialogues in natural resources management: Theory and practice. Springer, Berlin.

 

Products

Winds of Change – a climate board game for two to four players. Authors: Armin Haas, Klaus Hasselmann, Carlo C. Jaeger. (see: www.european-climate-forum.net/woc/index.html)



References

Rayner, S. and Malone, E. 1998. Ten suggestions for policymakers. In: Rayner, S. and Malone, E. (Eds.), Human Choice and Climate Change, vol.4: What Have We Learned. Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, pp. 109-138.

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