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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"Spike in global temperature fuels climate change fears"

Recent February's spike in global temperatures was the biggest departure from the norm in 137 years of records. "We are running out of time to avoid a 2-degree world", PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf comments. Source: The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), 25.03.2016

"Spike in global temperature fuels climate change fears" - Read More…

"Welcome to the Climate Emergency"

Global temperature records have recently been broken again and again, last February was 1.35°C warmer than average. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf states that this is not a surprise and that "time has almost run out to get emissions down". Source: The Guardian, 17.03.2016

"Welcome to the Climate Emergency" - Read More…

"February’s global temperature spike is a wake-up call"

Global February Temperatures showed a disturbing upward spike. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf and Steve Sherwood from the University of New South Wales explain how global warming and El Niño combine to produce the record warmth. Source: The Conversation (UK), 16.03.2016.

"February’s global temperature spike is a wake-up call" - Read More…

"February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount"

In this February, the Earth's overall surface temperature was about 1.35°C warmer than the average temperature for the month. Do we face a climate emergency? PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf and other experts comment on the record-breaking temperature. Source: The Guardian (UK), 14.03.2016.

"February breaks global temperature records by 'shocking' amount" - Read More…

"How massive Sea-Level Rise really is"

Could Geo-Engineering help us counter future sea-level rise? A new PIK-study shows: the sea-level rise is too big to be pumped away. PIK-scientist Anders Levermann explains the results and their meaning for the future discussion on climate change. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 10.03.2016.

"How massive Sea-Level Rise really is" - Read More…

"Global warming already driving increases in rainfall extremes"

The number of record-breaking rainfalls increases worldwide - related to global warming. Already in 2015, a team of PIK-scientists around Jascha Lehmann and Dim Coumou figured out an innovative method and found, that at least every tenth rainfall record of the last thirty years stands in direct correlation with climate change. Source: Nature, 07.03.2016.

"Global warming already driving increases in rainfall extremes" - Read More…

"Climate scientists worry about the costs of sea level rise"

Damages from extreme events like floods are even more relevant than the mean sea level itself when it comes to the costs of climate impacts for coastal regions. A new PIK-study now provides a method to quantify monetary losses from coastal floods under sea-level rise. Source: The Guardian (UK), 02.03.2016.

"Climate scientists worry about the costs of sea level rise" - Read More…

"Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries"

During past millennia sea-level has never risen as fast as during the last century, as a new PIK-study shows. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf explains, why the study is for sea level what the famous 'hockey stick' diagram was for global temperature. Source: The New York Times (USA), 23.02.2016.

"Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries" - Read More…

"With unconstrained emissions..."

A new PIK study shows: sea-levels worldwide will likely rise by 50 to 130 centimeters by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced rapidly. PIK-scientist Matthias Mengel and others give an insight in the results. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 22.02.2016.

"With unconstrained emissions..." - Read More…

"Here's how we could cut the global food gap in half"

Efficient water management could raise the world's calorie production about 40 per cent by 2050, a new PIK-study shows. Some of the harmful climate change effects on crop yields could be buffered. PIK-scientist Jonas Jägermeyr comments on the results. Source: SciDev.net (USA), cited by Time Magazine (USA) as 'Today's best idea' on 16.02.2016.

"Here's how we could cut the global food gap in half" - Read More…

"What the Earth will be like in 10,000 years"

Before being slowly removed again by natural processes, carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere for a very long time. So today's human-made emissions might still affect nature and people in hundreds of years, as PIK-scientist Anders Levermann explains. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 08.02.2016.

"What the Earth will be like in 10,000 years" - Read More…

"Did a Slow Gulf Stream Make the East Coast Blizzard Worse?"

In early 2015, a PIK-study showed the slow-down of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation - as a possible consequence of human-made climate change. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf explains, how this might have contributed to the big blizzard in the USA in January. Source: Scientific American (USA), 29.01.2016.

"Did a Slow Gulf Stream Make the East Coast Blizzard Worse?" - Read More…

"Heat records near impossible without manmade climate change"

13 of the 15 hottest years in the last 150 years occured after 2000. A new PIK-study estimates an as low as 0.01% per cent chance that the recent global heat records happened due to natural climate variations. PIK-scientist Stefan Rahmstorf comments on the results. Source: The Guardian (UK), 25.01.2016.

"Heat records near impossible without manmade climate change" - Read More…

"Two-thirds are down to human-made emissions"

Melting glaciers, wildfires and dwindling marine ecosystems - only some of the observable impacts of climate change. A new PIK-study shows that two-thirds of the problems caused by climate change are down to human-made emissions. PIK-scientist Gerrit Hansen explains the results. Source: The Independent (UK), 21.01.2016.

"Two-thirds are down to human-made emissions" - Read More…

"Welcome to the Anthropocene - Era of human driven climate"

A new PIK-study cracked the code of glacial inception and showed that humanity as a geological force is able to suppress the beginning of the next ice age. PIK-director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber explains the current results and the term of 'Anthropocene'. Source: Envisionation (UK), 16.01.2016.

"Welcome to the Anthropocene - Era of human driven climate" - Read More…

"We will affect climate for at least 100,000 years"

"Today it is humankind with its emissions from burning fossil fuels that determines the future development of the planet", PIK-director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber resumes in concern of a new PIK-study's results. PIK-scientist Andrej Ganopolski explains how CO2 could delay the next ice age. Source: CNN (USA), 14.01.2016

"We will affect climate for at least 100,000 years" - Read More…

"Earth's deep-freeze tipping point"

Ice ages had shaped the global environment like no other force on the planet, as PIK-director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber says. "Now human interference is acting as a huge geological force", he comments on a new PIK-study that shows that human-driven emissions could postpone the next ice age. Source: The Guardian (UK), 13.01.2016.

"Earth's deep-freeze tipping point" - Read More…

"Greenhouse gas emissions have canceled the next ice age"

"The next two glacial inceptions will be suppressed by the current cumulative emissions", comments PIK-director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber on the results of a new PIK study. "The ice ages are called off, if you like, by human interference." Source: The Washington Post (USA), 13.01.2016.

"Greenhouse gas emissions have canceled the next ice age" - Read More…

"Carbon emissions 'postpone ice age"

A new PIK study found the relation of insolation and CO2 concentration in the atmosphere to be the key criterion to explain the last eight glacial cycles in Earth history. PIK-scientist Andrej Ganopolski explains the influence of human-made carbon emissions on coming ice age periods. Source. BBC (UK), 13.01.2016.

"Carbon emissions 'postpone ice age" - Read More…

"Climate expert calls for decarbonisation"

To meet the aims negotiated at the UN Climate Conference, far-reaching measures soon have to be implemented. PIK-director Hans Joachim Schellnhuber suggests afforestation to extract carbon from the atmosphere, but emphasizes decarbonisation as the "main route" to reach the targets. Source: The Guardian (UK), 14.12.2015.

"Climate expert calls for decarbonisation" - Read More…

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