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PIK in the Media

Please find selected media articles featuring or written by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) here. For articles published only in German, please see the German version of our website.

"Earth at risk of becoming 'hothouse' if tipping point reached"

CNN (USA) - A new study with involvement of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) shows: the Earth is at risk of heading towards an irreversible "Hothouse" state. The scientists analyzed several points of no return: "These tipping elements can potentially act like a row of dominoes. Once one is pushed over, it pushes Earth towards another. [...] Places on Earth will become uninhabitable if 'Hothouse Earth' becomes the reality", said the designated PIK-director Johan Rockström. Source: CNN International (USA), 07.08.2018.

"Earth at risk of becoming 'hothouse' if tipping point reached" - Read More…

"Earth risks tipping into 'hothouse' state: study"

The Independent (Bangladesh) - An international team of scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and other renowned institutions discovered: even if the CO2 emission reductions negotiated in the Paris Agreement are achieved, the planet risks entering conditions what the scientists call "Hothouse Earth". A cascade of points of no return "may tip the entire Earth system into a new mode of operation," said PIK-director John Schellnhuber. Source: The Independent (Bangladesh), 07.08.2018.

"Earth risks tipping into 'hothouse' state: study" - Read More…

"Terra corre risco de entrar em 'efeito estufa' irreversível"

UOL (Brazil) - By analyzing natural feedback processes, scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and other international institutions showed that Earth is at risk entering an irreversible "hothouse" state. Chances of avoiding this requires not only the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions but also measures like improved forest, agricultural and soil management, biodiversity conservation and technologies that remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the new study says. Source: UOL (Brazil), 07.08.2018. Article in Portugese.

"Terra corre risco de entrar em 'efeito estufa' irreversível" - Read More…

"Vers des canicules de plus en plus fréquentes"

France24 (France) - The current extraordinary heat in the entire northern hemisphere is highly unusual. At the same time the last three years have been the warmest globally since weather records began. Scientists like Anders Levermann from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) expect such extreme episodes likelier to occur in the future without a rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Source: France24 (France) with Agence France Presse (AFP), 26.07.2018. Article in French.

"Vers des canicules de plus en plus fréquentes" - Read More…

"How a carbon tax could fight poverty and climate change at the same time"

Anthropocene Magazine (International) - Prices for the emission of greenhouse gases like CO2 would not only be a stimulus for the withdrawal from the burning of fossil fuels. It could also make substantial financial resources available for succeeding the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a new study with involvement of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) finds. "If you look at both climate and sustainable development policies at the same time, it turns out that carbon pricing could indeed address both problems simultaneously and effectively", says lead author Max Franks from PIK. Source: Anthropocene Magazine (International), 24.07.2018.

"How a carbon tax could fight poverty and climate change at the same time" - Read More…

"Climate change will affect our food production"

Sustainable Transitions Blog (Germany) - How do our diets affect climate change? How will our changing diets affect the climate in the future? What is food waste and how do you measure it? Where do people waste the most food? What is a yield gap? Why does it matter in the context of climate change? These questions and more are answered in this 32 minute interview by PIK-scientist Prajal Pradhan. Source: Sustainable Transitions Blog (Germany), 20.07.2018.

"Climate change will affect our food production" - Read More…

"Will extreme weather become even deadlier?"

Deutsche Welle (Germany) - "Our Earth is once again being hit by extreme weather, including extreme heat and wildfires in California, and devastating floods of rain in Japan. Based on the laws of physics, due to global warming, we must expect more frequent and worsening events", says the renowned scientist Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) in a statement. "This trend can only be halted if the Paris Agreement for stabilizing our climate is rapidly and fully implemented", he adds. Source: Deutsche Welle (Germany), 12.07.2018.

"Will extreme weather become even deadlier?" - Read More…

"Economic optimization risks tipping of important Earth system elements"

Business Mirror (Philippines) - Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) now used mathematical methods for the comparison of different economic and governance concepts. It turned out that the concept of profit maximization is not sufficient to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system that could dramatically change our livelihoods. And which of the other examined concepts (sustainability or the safe operating space approach, relying on the Planetary Boundaries concept) is most suitable, depends on the specific circumstances: "It turns out that there is no master concept for countering environmental challenges", says PIK-scientist Jürgen Kurths who contributed to the study. Source: Business Mirror (Philippines), 11.07.2018.

"Economic optimization risks tipping of important Earth system elements" - Read More…

"Lab-grown livestock feed may ease climatic effects of feed production"

UPI News Agency (USA) - Today's conventional agricultural feed cultivation has severe impacts on the environment and climate. A new study with involvement of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) now evaluated the potential economic and environmental effects of an increasing replacement of the conventional feed by industrial microbes. "Cultivating feed protein in labs instead of using croplands might be able to mitigate some environmental and climatic impacts of feed production", says PIK-scientist Benjamin Bodirsky who contributed to the study. Source: United Press International (USA), 20.06.2018.

"Lab-grown livestock feed may ease climatic effects of feed production" - Read More…

"West Antarctic Ice Sheet unlikely to reverse retreat"

Iran Daily (Iran) - After the last ice age about 10.000 years ago, the Antarctic ice was melting due to rising temperatures. The retreat was then surprisingly reversed by processes which themselves were also caused by the melting. But these reversal processes are slow: "Given the speed of current climate change from burning fossil fuels, the mechanism we detected unfortunately does not work fast enough to save today's ice sheets from melting and causing seas to rise" says Torsten Albrecht from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) who was one of the authors of the study. Source: Iran Daily (Iran), 17.06.2018.

"West Antarctic Ice Sheet unlikely to reverse retreat" - Read More…

"Scientists trace ice sheets in history of West, East Antarctica"

Xinhua News Ageny (China) - After the end of the last ice-age, the shrinking of the Antarctic ice itself stopped the shrinking: without the weight of the melted ice, the Earth crust lifted - and thus triggered the re-advance of the ice sheet. "[The ice] retreated inland by more than 1.000 kilometers in a period of 1.000 years in this region. [...] Instead of total collapse, the ice-sheet grew again by up to 400 kilometers. This is an amazing self-induced stabilization", says the concerning study's co-author Torsten Albrecht from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). But this slow reversal mechanism will not stop sea-level rise today. Source: Xinhua (China), 14.06.2018.

"Scientists trace ice sheets in history of West, East Antarctica" - Read More…

"Global warming: trouble with water resources in Central Asia will increase"

Kabar News Agency (Kyrgyzstan) - At the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), more than 300 scientists investigate crucial topics of global environmental change, climate change impacts and sustainable development on a global and on a regional scale. Among the analyzed regions is Central Asia, where questions of water are particularly complex. "Water resources are the foundation for political, social and economic stability", says PIK-scientist Anastasia Lobanova in an interview with the major Kyrgyz news agency Kabar. Source: Kabar News Agency (Kyrgyzstan), 05.06.2018. Article in Russian.

"Global warming: trouble with water resources in Central Asia will increase" - Read More…

"Trump's economic isolationism is climate-blind"

The Hill (USA) - "Trump does not believe in climate change, but that won't make it go away, and it does not only have consequences for the much-ridiculed polar bears and coral reefs. It spells trouble for national economies across the globe and all of our wallets as well", writes PIK-scientist Anders Levermann in a guest commentary. "The destabilization of the climate that we are causing by our carbon emissions needs to be stopped: The burning of coal, oil and gas has to be phased out. We need climate realism instead of national chauvinism." Source: The Hill (USA), 29.05.2018.

"Trump's economic isolationism is climate-blind" - Read More…

"Want to Escape the Coming Floods? Balance Global Trade"

Bloomberg (USA) - A new study with involvement of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) shows: increasing floods worsened by global warming could lead to regional production losses worldwide - with effects that might propagate through the global network of trade and supply chains. Besides the rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, "the answer is not isolationism", says PIK-scientist Anders Levermann who contributed to the study. "The answer is getting better trade relations." Source: Bloomberg (USA), 28.05.2018.

"Want to Escape the Coming Floods? Balance Global Trade" - Read More…

"Climate Change in South Asia"

KBIA (USA) - In a new Worldbank report, Southern Asia is identified as one of the world's most vulnerable regions to migration forced by climate change impacts. Along with a number of other economical and social factors, water scarcity and yield failures become more and more important drivers. PIK-scientist Jacob Schewe contributed to the report and joins the program on "Climate Change in South Asia" by Global Journalist aired by the award-winning US radio station KBIA. Source: KBIA (USA), 17.05.2018.

"Climate Change in South Asia" - Read More…

"Hot Nature Weakens and Wilts"

Radio Ecoshock (Canada) - The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) was found weaker today than any time before in over 1000 years by a new study conducted by an international team of scientists around Levke Caesar from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Hundreds of millions of people on both sides of the Atlantic could be affected by the climatic consequences of an alteration of the major system of ocean circulations. Lead-author Caesar explains the study in detail in a 28 minute radio interview. Source: Radio Ecoshock (Canada), 03.05.2018.

"Hot Nature Weakens and Wilts" - Read More…

"What if the ocean's climate-controlling 'conveyor belt' came to a halt?"

FOX News (USA) - "The specific trend pattern we found in measurements looks exactly like what is predicted by computer simulations as a result of a slowdown in the Gulf Stream system [...] And I see no other plausible explanation for it," comments Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) on a new study that delivers stronger evidence for a weakening of the Atlantic overturning circulation (AMOC). Source: FOX News (USA), 17.04.2018.

"What if the ocean's climate-controlling 'conveyor belt' came to a halt?" - Read More…

"The oceans' circulation hasn't been this sluggish in 1,000 years. That's bad news."

The Washington Post (USA) - Scientific analysis of sea surface temperature data provides new evidence that the major ocean circulation called Atlantic overturning has slowed down by about 15 percent in the last 70 years. Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) tells the major US newspaper The Washington Post, that this was "something that climate models have predicted for a long time, but we weren't sure it was really happening. I think it is happening, [...] And I think it's bad news." Climate change is a prime suspect for the worrying weakening. Source: The Washington Post (USA), 11.04.2018.

"The oceans' circulation hasn't been this sluggish in 1,000 years. That's bad news." - Read More…

"Study: Global Warming Is Weakening Key Ocean Circulation"

The New York Times (USA) - The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), of which the widely known Gulf Stream is a part, is one of our planet's most important heat transport systems. A new scientific study by a team around Levke Caesar and Stefan Rahmstorf from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), provides stronger evidence for the weakening of the AMOC - which is weaker today than any time before in more than 1000 years. Source: The New York Times (USA), 11.04.2018.

"Study: Global Warming Is Weakening Key Ocean Circulation" - Read More…

"Wealth inequality: Closing the gap by taxing land and bequests"

Environews (Nigeria) - "To reduce wealth inequality without diminishing the economic performance of a country, a policy package of bequest taxes and land value taxes could be the optimal solution", reports Environews Nigeria on a new study led by Max Franks from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). "The conceptual study shows how governments can help everyone to attain his or her fair share of the pie without shrinking it", he says. Source: Environews (Nigeria), 27.03.2018.

"Wealth inequality: Closing the gap by taxing land and bequests" - Read More…

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